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Mental Health Counseling Now Available For Long Island Shluchim

by CrownHeights.info

Under the leadership of Rabbi Tuvia Teldon, Regional Director of Chabad Lubavitch of Long Island, the area Shluchim have received help and subsidies in many areas of their personal lives and Shlichus. Now they will also have access to professional Mental Health Counseling.

“Life has challenges. That’s a fact,” wrote Rabbi Teldon in an email to the Shluchim. “At times, situations may arise where we need guidance, input, and counseling from more than a mashpia. Sometimes we need advice from a professional counselor.”

With over fifty families of shluchim in Long Island, this past year has been especially high pressure for many.

“In light of this past year, even if one shliach or shlucha takes advantage of this offer, it will be worth it,” Rabbi Teldon told CrownHeights.info.

Programs to help Shluchiom in their personal lives is not a new concept. Chabad on Campus has had a long-standing program to help Shluchim in their time of need, and Chabad of New Jersey has just recently created a local mental health program for New Jersey Shluchim.

“It’s time that the Long Island Shluchim get this as well,” Teldon said. “This is just taking it to the next step.”

In order to help alleviate the financial burden of counseling and therapy, Chabad of Long Island announced that it will subsidize up to 50% of the cost of each therapy session with a maximum amount of $75 per session.

While there are some restrictions, according to the internal email, Rabbi Teldon hopes to eliminate those in the near future.

“I do hope that in whatever small way, this will help to get past the stigma of going to a therapist and perhaps other Head Shluchim will follow suit,” Teldon told Crown Heights.info.

Mental health is a growing issue across the entire world, and Chabad has remained a leader in proactive and crisis care mental health care.

An estimated 26% of Americans ages 18 and older, about 1 in 4 adults, suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder. Of these, only half receive any mental health care.

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